Sunday, August 9, 2009

Jumbo Glacier Resort Project

Jumbo Glacier Resort, a proposed year-round ski resort in British Columbia's East Kootenays is one huge step closer to becoming reality. At the Regional District of East Kootenay's (RDEK) monthly board meeting Friday, local politicians voted 8-7 to hand planning responsibility for the proposed Jumbo Glacier Resort over to the province. The board will ask the province to create a separate municipality for Jumbo Glacier, taking away local responsibility for zoning.
The plan has been in the work since the early 1990s (the first local public consultation for JGR started in the summer of 1991). Developers spent over a decade seeking approval for the project from successive provincial governments before clearing a major hurdle in 2007 when the master plan was approved.
Despite this huge step the development is still a long way from becoming a reality. The province still has to agree to create a resort municipality at Jumbo.
Jumbo Glacier Resort is located at the foot of Jumbo Mountain and Jumbo Glacier, 55 km west of Invermere, British Columbia (Canada). The year round resort, centred on a former sawmill site, will provide lift-serviced access to several nearby glaciers at an elevation of up to 3,400 metres (11,155 feet). The resort is planned in three phases and will ultimately include 5,500 bed-units (plus 750 beds for staff accommodations) in a 104 hectare resort base area. At build-out, the resort will see 2,000 to 3,000 visitors in high season. In winter, the resort will offer 1,700 metres (5,500 feet) of 100% natural snow vertical. In summer, up to 700 metres (2,300 feet) of glacier skiing vertical will be available.
At full build-out, the proposed $450 million resort would provide approximately 3,750 person years of construction employment and create 750 to 800 permanent full-time jobs.
"Jumbo Resort would be an ongoing employer for many years and with the College offering re-training to many mill workers, this is the closest economic stimulus we have had in a long time for this valley. Tourism is Radium’s number one economic driver. Jumbo will only enhance our future", said Dee Conklin, mayor of Radium Hot Springs and RDEK director.

5 comments:

TheMainCourse said...

It is wonderful to see this project is finally getting the chance to move forward after so many years of miss information and opposition propaganda.

Lea said...

Please do not support this project. As a resident of this spectacular valley and someone who has travelled far and wide, there are few places left like this. I too live to ski, but do not believe that the commercialization of this beautiful wilderness is necessary nor beneficial for anyone but a small, greedy few. Please ski at an established resort or use your own power to get here, but do not support the Jumbo machine. There may be misinformation from both sides of the argument, but it doesn't take too much of a leap of logic to realize the destruction of swathes of forest and the relocation of thousands of people into this area can have no environmental benefits, only impacts.

I work in the bush and just today I have the divine pleasure of kneeling beside a river that runs from the Jumbo Glacier, putting my lips to the surface of the flow and gulping down some of the cleanest, purest water left on this earth. We have ruined so much of this world, can we not leave something good behind?

Lea said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
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SmylsDys said...

Lea,

Jumbo Creek runs into Toby Creek which is impacted by leaching tailings from the Mineral King Mine, Panorama Mountain Village and the Town of Invermere's wastewater. Jumbo will be the only development within the drainage to have tertiary wastewater treatment and the Jumbo Valley is 85% harvested. What river were you kneeling beside?? Please stop spreading misinformation.

Jumbo is the best thing to happen to the ski industry in a generation.